Bibian Blue Barcelona

I´ve been a bit absent on this blog for a while due to a very hectic life at the moment. I´m doing an internship with Barcelona based corset designer Bibian Blue. It´s a lot of fun and I´m learning a lot. Plus I´m also working on starting up my own accessory online shop, and doing some upholstery work on the side (phew!!), so all that has left little time for blogging. Well more like, few things to blog about, as I´m still in the process of producing things, and don´t have that much to show you yet. Anyway, in the meantime I thought I´d share some of the work of the incredible designer where I´m lucky enough to have gotten an internship. Here are some of amazing the dresses from the new collection Crystal Flowers S/S “12. Hope you´ll like it!

All images are borrowed from the Bibian Blue Blog.

Blog Make Over

So I´m making a few changes to my dear blog. This one will from now on be focused on design and fashion related topics, such as my work for example, and I´m moving all of my “nutrition, feminism, save the world posts” to my new blog The Bell Pepper Blog. So if you´re interested in anything in that area please follow me there!🙂

Oh, and I apologize for the mess on this blog while I´m reconstructing it.🙂

My awesome beauty tips!

I´m always ridiculously excited to try new beauty products (preferably as natural as possible), and right now I`m impatiently waiting for the delivery of my latest order.

First of all the one miracle oil to rule them all, organic coconut oil. A completely natural oil that makes your skin baby smooth, your hair soft and shiny and also contains acids that are antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal. A daily intake of coconut oil can also help with weight loss, boost your immune system and a bunch of other health benefits. It´s a very popular ingredient/skin care product in the low carb community because of its amazing qualities, yet I´m still a coconut oil virgin, but after hearing so many positive things about it, I felt like it was finally time to give my dry winter skin some much needed lovin´.

This one is from UK brand Fushi.

Also I stocked up on some organic Castor oil, the current best friend of my skin and hair. I use it as a deep cleaning facial cleanser and also as a hair conditioner once in a while (although I´m a bit lazy with my hair most of the time).

Castor oil also from Fushi.

And last but not least, after a horrifying hair episode where there may have been a bleach and a dye too many in an attempt to get that amazing Jessica from True Blood-shade of red on my fragile scandinavian locks. I ended up with 10 different shades of red and a slight steel wool texture, so I decided it was best to go back to a more basic shade of brown and book an appointment with a hair dresser to chop off the evidence of my failure. So now I´m trying to make up for this abuse by investing in some good hair products. Believing the internet beauty gossip horse shampoo is the way to go! Yup that´s right, apparently there are some magical beneficial ingredients that do not come with human shampoo, that makes your hair softer, healthier and grow faster. Mane N Tail (yeah that´s really what it´s called) is supposedly the mother of all horse shampoos, so here we go, one giant bottle of shampoo and conditioner added to shopping cart.

I can´t wait to try these out! Will keep you posted on the upcoming magical transformation!;)

Kate´s french castle

Oh, this makes me happy! I looove 18th century France, the fashion, the interiors! Looove!!! Some day I want my very own 18th century castle!

Kate Moss for Vogue.

How to talk to little girls

I want to share an article with you today, written by Lisa Bloom, author of Think: Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in a Dumbed Down World. It explains in a very enlightening way how we subconsciously help creating gender stereotypes while communicating with kids, even though our intentions of course are nothing but the best.

How to talk to little girls

“I went to a dinner party at a friend’s home last weekend, and met her five-year-old daughter for the first time.

Little Maya was all curly brown hair, doe-like dark eyes, and adorable in her shiny pink nightgown. I wanted to squeal, “Maya, you’re so cute! Look at you! Turn around and model that pretty ruffled gown, you gorgeous thing!”

But I didn’t. I squelched myself. As I always bite my tongue when I meet little girls, restraining myself from my first impulse, which is to tell them how darn cute/ pretty/ beautiful/ well-dressed/ well-manicured/ well-coiffed they are.

What’s wrong with that? It’s our culture’s standard talking-to-little-girls icebreaker, isn’t it? And why not give them a sincere compliment to boost their self-esteem? Because they are so darling I just want to burst when I meet them, honestly.

Hold that thought for just a moment.

This week ABC News reported that nearly half of all three- to six-year-old girls worry about being fat. In my book, Think: Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in a Dumbed-Down World, I reveal that 15 to 18 percent of girls under 12 now wear mascara, eyeliner and lipstick regularly; eating disorders are up and self-esteem is down; and 25 percent of young American women would rather win America’s Next Top Model than the Nobel Peace Prize. Even bright, successful college women say they’d rather be hot than smart. A Miami mom just died from cosmetic surgery, leaving behind two teenagers. This keeps happening, and it breaks my heart.

Teaching girls that their appearance is the first thing you notice tells them that looks are more important than anything. It sets them up for dieting at age 5 and foundation at age 11 and boob jobs at 17 and Botox at 23. As our cultural imperative for girls to be hot 24/7 has become the new normal, American women have become increasingly unhappy. What’s missing? A life of meaning, a life of ideas and reading books and being valued for our thoughts and accomplishments.”

Image borrowed from TLC

“That’s why I force myself to talk to little girls as follows.

“Maya,” I said, crouching down at her level, looking into her eyes, “very nice to meet you.”

“Nice to meet you too,” she said, in that trained, polite, talking-to-adults good girl voice.

“Hey, what are you reading?” I asked, a twinkle in my eyes. I love books. I’m nuts for them. I let that show.

Her eyes got bigger, and the practiced, polite facial expression gave way to genuine excitement over this topic. She paused, though, a little shy of me, a stranger.

“I LOVE books,” I said. “Do you?”

Most kids do.

“YES,” she said. “And I can read them all by myself now!”

“Wow, amazing!” I said. And it is, for a five-year-old. You go on with your bad self, Maya.

“What’s your favorite book?” I asked.

“I’ll go get it! Can I read it to you?”

Purplicious was Maya’s pick and a new one to me, as Maya snuggled next to me on the sofa and proudly read aloud every word, about our heroine who loves pink but is tormented by a group of girls at school who only wear black. Alas, it was about girls and what they wore, and how their wardrobe choices defined their identities. But after Maya closed the final page, I steered the conversation to the deeper issues in the book: mean girls and peer pressure and not going along with the group. I told her my favorite color in the world is green, because I love nature, and she was down with that.

Not once did we discuss clothes or hair or bodies or who was pretty. It’s surprising how hard it is to stay away from those topics with little girls, but I’m stubborn.

I told her that I’d just written a book, and that I hoped she’d write one too one day. She was fairly psyched about that idea. We were both sad when Maya had to go to bed, but I told her next time to choose another book and we’d read it and talk about it. Oops. That got her too amped up to sleep, and she came down from her bedroom a few times, all jazzed up.”

“So, one tiny bit of opposition to a culture that sends all the wrong messages to our girls. One tiny nudge towards valuing female brains. One brief moment of intentional role modeling. Will my few minutes with Maya change our multibillion dollar beauty industry, reality shows that demean women, our celebrity-manic culture? No. But I did change Maya’s perspective for at least that evening.

Try this the next time you meet a little girl. She may be surprised and unsure at first, because few ask her about her mind, but be patient and stick with it. Ask her what she’s reading. What does she like and dislike, and why? There are no wrong answers. You’re just generating an intelligent conversation that respects her brain. For older girls, ask her about current events issues: pollution, wars, school budgets slashed. What bothers her out there in the world? How would she fix it if she had a magic wand? You may get some intriguing answers. Tell her about your ideas and accomplishments and your favorite books. Model for her what a thinking woman says and does.”

Lisa Bloom for Huffington Post

The Art of Fashion print 2012

Susan Sarandon and her daughter Eva Amurri Martino star in Neiman Marcus’ The Art of Fashion print campaign for Spring 2012, wearing a number of designers such as Prada, Valentino, Vera Wang, Armani, Tom Ford, Chanel, Oscar de la Renta. They both look stunning and Eva looks so much like her mother with her incredible eyes and gorgeous red hair.

Source; Neiman Marcus The March Book

A Neon Wedding

I love the idea of inserting a touch of neon into the otherwise so pale wedding photos. I think with all that white you definitely need a splash of color and a strong make up to really make you pop out from the background on your special day.

För more amazing photos, visit producer & stylist Sonia at Want That Wedding

Photographer ~ Kat Hill Fotographie

Wedding Dresses ~ Kitty & Dulcie

Oh My Honey

Wedding Shoes ~ Rachel Simpson


Abiogenesis collection “12/”13

I´ve been MIA on this blog for a while and the reason for that is that I´ve been working ny butt off trying to finish the first presentation of my thesis project which took place yesterday. We had to present a number of things to explain our concept, our inspiration and our collection. One of the things was to take 10 photos that represent the concept, the feeling we want to convey with our final collection. My inspiration comes from the microscopic images of human cells that I posted earlier and I wanted my photos to give the feeling of cells dividing and interacting, evolving from one stage to another.

So, starting with my concept description, here´s the first part of my thesis project presentation.